June 18, 2024
Lavandin and Lavender

Lavandin and Lavender 7 best Difference

Definition of Lavandin and Lavender

Lavandin: Lavandin refers to a hybrid plant that is derived from the crossbreeding of two lavender species, namely Lavandula angustifolia (true lavender) and Lavandula latifolia (spike lavender).

It is often classified as Lavandula x intermedia. Lavandin possesses similar characteristics to both parent plants and is widely cultivated for its aromatic properties. It is known for its vibrant fragrance and is commonly used in various industries such as aromatherapy, cosmetics, and household products.

Lavender: Lavender, scientifically known as Lavandula, is a genus of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It comprises several species, with Lavandula angustifolia being the most popular and commonly cultivated variety.

Lavender is renowned for its distinctive floral scent and is highly valued for its therapeutic and aromatic properties. It is widely used in the production of essential oils, fragrances, herbal remedies, and various personal care products. Lavender plants are prized ornamentals, often appearing in gardens and landscaped spaces across the world.

Importance of understanding the difference between Lavandin and Lavender

Understanding the difference between Lavandin and Lavender is important for several reasons:

  • Aromatic Profiles: Lavandin and Lavender have distinct aromatic profiles. Lavandin has a stronger and more camphorous scent compared to Lavender, which has a sweeter and more delicate aroma. Knowing these differences helps in choosing the appropriate fragrance for specific purposes, such as in aromatherapy or perfumery.
  • Therapeutic Properties: Lavandin and Lavender have different chemical compositions, resulting in variations in their therapeutic properties. Lavandin is known for its analgesic and antiseptic properties, making it beneficial for pain relief and disinfection. Lavender has long been revered for its soothing properties, making it useful in alleviating anxiety and encouraging restful sleep. Understanding these distinctions helps in selecting the right variety for specific therapeutic needs.
  • Cultivation and Growing Conditions: Lavandin and Lavender have different requirements when it comes to cultivation and growing conditions. Lavandin is typically more tolerant of harsher climates and has higher yields, making it suitable for commercial cultivation. Lavender grows best in milder environments and needs well-draining soil to grow successfully. Knowing these differences helps in choosing the appropriate plant for cultivation based on the available resources and climate conditions.
  • Applications and Uses: Lavandin and Lavender find applications in various industries, including aromatherapy, cosmetics, and culinary uses. Understanding the differences between the two varieties helps in selecting the right ingredient for specific applications. For example, Lavandin’s stronger scent makes it suitable for cleaning and household products, while Lavender’s sweeter aroma is often used in perfumes and personal care products. Lavender can also be utilized in culinary applications, including flavoring sweet treats and beverages with its aromatic qualities.
  • Safety Considerations: Although Lavandin and Lavender are generally safe to use, understanding any potential side effects or precautions associated with each variety is crucial. Some individuals may have allergic reactions to either Lavandin or Lavender and being aware of these potential risks helps in making informed decisions and ensuring safe usage.

Understanding the difference between Lavandin and Lavender is essential for selecting the right variety based on fragrance preferences, therapeutic needs, cultivation conditions, specific applications, and safety considerations.

This knowledge enhances the effectiveness and appropriateness of their use in various industries and personal settings.

Botanical Classification

Lavender and Lavandin belong to the Lamiaceae (formerly Labiatae), or mint family, botanically speaking. However, each is classified separately within its Lavandula genus.

Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia) is an offspring of two lavender species: Lavandula angustifolia (true lavender) and Lavandula latifolia (spike lavender), produced through hybridization. “X Intermedia” indicates its hybrid origin.

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia being the most frequently grown variety) is one of several species belonging to Genus Lavender; Lavandula angustifolia, more popularly referred to as English lavender or true lavender is one of them and widely appreciated for both its aromatic properties as well as therapeutic ones.

Lavandin and Lavender share the same Lavandula genus; however, their species and hybridization patterns make each distinctive.

What is the Lavandin?

Lavandin is also known scientifically as Lavandula intermedia. It is a hybrid that was created by crossing two lavender species, Lavandula anigustifolia, and Lavandula latiflora. Lavandin is often known by its French moniker due to its development there.

Lavandin possesses characteristics that are intermediate between its parent species. It typically grows larger and taller than true lavender, reaching heights of up to 2-3 feet (60-90 cm). The flowers of Lavandin are often larger and more robust than true lavender, and they are arranged in long, slender spikes.

One of the distinguishing features of Lavandin is its fragrance. It has a stronger and more camphorous scent compared to true lavender, with hints of herbal and floral notes. This distinct aroma makes Lavandin popular in the fragrance industry, where it is used in perfumes, soaps, and other scented products.

Lavandin
Figure 01: Lavandin

Lavandin is cultivated commercially in various regions, including France, Spain, and parts of North America. Attractively cultivated lavender varieties produce high yields of essential oil, making them highly valued as economic producers of aromatherapy oils and other lavender-related products.

Lavandin’s robust nature and tolerance to harsher climates make it suitable for commercial cultivation in areas where true lavender may struggle to thrive.

The essential oil extracted from Lavandin contains various chemical compounds, including linalool, linalyl acetate, camphor, and cineole. Lavandin contains constituents that contribute to its therapeutic advantages, including analgesic, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory actions.

Lavandin is a distinct lavender hybrid with its own unique characteristics, fragrance, and commercial significance. It is widely used in the fragrance industry and is valued for its robust growth and higher essential oil yield compared to true lavender.

What Is Lavender (Lavandula)

Lavender, scientifically known as Lavandula, is a flowering plant genus in the mint family Lamiaceae that includes multiple species; Lavandula angustifolia (commonly cultivated and recognized variety) is widely cultivated and recognized for cultivation as English lavender or true lavender.

Lavender is widely revered for its aromatic and therapeutic benefits. Lavender grows as a small perennial shrub usually reaching heights between one to three feet (30-90 cm), producing narrow, elongated leaves with narrow flowers in compact spikes of various hues of purple; some varieties even feature pink or white blossoms!

The lavender fragrance is floral, herbaceous, sweet and relaxing. Over time, its essential oil extracted from its flowers has become widely utilized for skincare, perfumes, soaps and candles, aromatherapy applications to relax stress and improve sleep, as well as aromatherapy therapy to promote calmness, reduce tension and facilitate better restful nights’ rest.

Lavender (Lavandula)
Figure 02: Lavender (Lavandula)

Additionally, aromatherapy uses lavender essential oil as one component in its therapy sessions as it has proven useful at improving outcomes and relieving symptoms such as insomnia.

Lavender can be found cultivated worldwide in Mediterranean nations, the UK, France and parts of North America. Lavender thrives best under conditions with well-drained soil and sunny exposure while flourishing best when planted in regions with temperate climates.

Lavender is famed for its aromatic qualities; however, its numerous medicinal applications also include antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic uses that aid relaxation and pain management. Furthermore, lavender’s flowers and leaves have long been utilized as culinary spices, used to flavor desserts, teas and beverages alike.

Lavandula angustifolia is only one species and variety of lavender; others exist, each possessing unique traits and applications. Examples are Lavandula stoechas (French lavender), Lavandula dentata (fringed lavender) and the hybrid Lavandula x intermedia (lavender).

Overall, lavender is an incredible plant with an extensive human history of usage. From its stunning fragrance and therapeutic benefits to culinary use in gardens, households, and various industries – lavender remains one of our go-to herbs!

What is the Difference Between Lavandin and Lavender?

The difference between Lavandin and Lavender lies in their botanical classification, physical characteristics, fragrance, chemical composition, cultivation, and uses.

Here are the key distinctions:

Botanical Classification:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin is a hybrid plant (Lavandula x intermedia) resulting from the crossbreeding of Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia.
  • Lavender: Lavender refers to the Lavandula genus, with Lavandula angustifolia being the most commonly cultivated variety.

Physical Characteristics:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin is typically larger and taller than Lavender, reaching heights of up to 2-3 feet (60-90 cm). Its flowers are larger and arranged in long, slender spikes.
  • Lavender: Lavender is a smaller perennial shrub, usually growing to a height of 1-3 feet (30-90 cm). Its flowers are arranged in compact spikes and come in various shades of purple, pink, or white.

Fragrance:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin has a stronger and more camphorous scent compared to Lavender. Its aroma is often described as herbal, with floral undertones.
  • Lavender: Lavender has a sweeter and more delicate floral fragrance, known for its calming and relaxing properties.

Chemical Composition:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin essential oil contains constituents such as linalool, linalyl acetate, camphor, and cineole. It is known for its analgesic and antiseptic properties.
  • Lavender: Lavender essential oil contains similar constituents but in different proportions. It is renowned for its calming, relaxing, and sleep-promoting effects.

Cultivation:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin is more tolerant of harsh climates and has higher yields, making it suitable for commercial cultivation in various regions, including France, Spain, and parts of North America.
  • Lavender: Lavender prefers milder climates and well-drained soil, making it well-suited for cultivation in regions like the Mediterranean, the United Kingdom, France, and parts of North America.

Uses and Applications:

  • Lavandin: Lavandin is commonly used in the fragrance industry, including perfumes, soaps, and scented products. It is also utilized in aromatherapy, cosmetics, and cleaning products.
  • Lavender: Lavender is widely used in aromatherapy for its calming and relaxing properties. It is a popular ingredient in perfumes, skincare products, herbal remedies, and culinary applications, such as flavoring desserts and beverages.

Lavandin and Lavender differ in their botanical classification, physical characteristics, fragrance profiles, chemical composition, cultivation requirements, and specific applications.

Understanding these differences helps in selecting the appropriate variety for various purposes, such as fragrance preferences, therapeutic needs, and cultivation conditions.

Lavandin vs Lavender in Tabular Form

Here’s a tabular form comparing Lavandin and Lavender:

Aspect Lavandin Lavender
Botanical Name Lavandula x intermedia Lavandula angustifolia
Fragrance Strong, robust, camphorous, herbal with floral undertones Sweet, floral, soothing, herbaceous
Plant Size Larger, more vigorous growth Smaller, compact growth
Flowering Season Late spring to summer Summer
Essential Oil Higher essential oil yield Lower essential oil yield
Chemical Composition Higher levels of camphor and cineole Higher levels of linalool and linalyl acetate
Uses Fragrance, aromatherapy, cleaning products, cosmetics Aromatherapy, skincare, perfumery, culinary

Please note that this table provides a general overview and that there may be variations within different varieties or cultivars of Lavandin and Lavender.

Physical Characteristics

Physical characteristics distinguish Lavandin and Lavender from each other. Here are the key differences in their physical attributes:

Lavandin:

  • Size: Lavandin plants are generally larger and taller compared to Lavender. They can reach heights of up to 2-3 feet (60-90 cm).
  • Flowers: Lavandin flowers are typically larger and more robust than Lavender flowers. They are arranged in long, slender spikes or clusters.
  • Color: Lavandin flowers come in various colors, including shades of purple, blue, and sometimes pink.

Lavender:

  • Size: Lavender plants are smaller in size compared to Lavandin. They typically grow to a height of 1-3 feet (30-90 cm).
  • Flowers: Lavender flowers are smaller and compact. They are densely arranged in spikes or clusters.
  • Color: Lavender flowers are best known for their signature purple hue. However, depending on the variety, these blooms may also come in pink or white shades.

Both Lavandin and Lavender have narrow, elongated leaves, but the key differences lie in their plant size and flower characteristics. Lavandin tends to have larger plants and flowers, while Lavender has smaller and more compact plants and flowers.

Fragrance

The fragrance of Lavandin and Lavender differs in terms of their scent profiles and intensity. Here are the distinctions between their fragrances:

Lavandin:

  • Scent Profile: Lavandin has a stronger and more pronounced fragrance compared to Lavender. It is often described as having a camphorous, herbal aroma with floral undertones.
  • Intensity: The scent of Lavandin is more potent and intense, making it ideal for those who prefer a robust and powerful fragrance.

Lavender:

  • Scent Profile: Lavender has a sweeter and more delicate floral fragrance compared to Lavandin. It is often described as soothing, herbaceous, and calming. The scent of Lavender is highly recognizable and has become synonymous with relaxation and tranquility.
  • Intensity: While Lavender has a distinct and noticeable aroma, it is generally milder and less overpowering compared to Lavandin. It is appreciated for its subtle and gentle fragrance.

The difference in fragrance between Lavandin and Lavender is primarily due to variations in their chemical compositions, including the concentration of aromatic compounds.

Lavandin’s stronger and more camphorous scent can be attributed to its higher levels of certain constituents such as camphor and cineole, while Lavender’s sweeter aroma is often attributed to higher concentrations of linalool and linalyl acetate.

The choice between Lavandin and Lavender for fragrance applications depends on personal preference and the desired intensity of the scent. Lavandin is often favored by those who enjoy a bolder and more robust fragrance, while Lavender appeals to individuals seeking a softer and more subtle floral aroma.

Chemical Composition

The chemical composition of Lavandin and Lavender essential oils contributes to their unique characteristics and therapeutic properties.

Here are the key differences in their chemical compositions:

Lavandin:

  • Constituents: Lavandin essential oil contains various chemical constituents, including linalool, linalyl acetate, camphor, and cineole. These compounds contribute to its fragrance and therapeutic effects.
  • Linalool: Lavandin essential oil contains a significant amount of linalool, which contributes to its floral and sweet aroma. Linalool is known for its calming and relaxing properties.
  • Linalyl Acetate: Lavandin also contains linalyl acetate, which contributes to its floral scent and is often associated with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.
  • Camphor and Cineole: Lavandin has higher levels of camphor and cineole compared to Lavender. These constituents give Lavandin its stronger and more camphorous aroma. Camphor is known for its analgesic properties, while cineole has expectorant and antimicrobial effects.

Lavender:

  • Constituents: Lavender essential oil also contains linalool and linalyl acetate but in different proportions compared to Lavandin. Other notable constituents in Lavender oil include terpinene-4-ol, Lavandula, and Lavandula acetate.
  • Linalool: Lavender essential oil is characterized by its high linalool content, contributing to its floral scent and relaxing properties.
  • Linalyl Acetate: Lavender oil also contains linalyl acetate, which adds to its fragrance and potential anti-inflammatory effects.
  • Terpinen-4-ol: Terpinen-4-ol is another important constituent in Lavender oil, known for its antimicrobial properties and potential skin-soothing effects.

The variations in chemical composition between Lavandin and Lavender contribute to their different aromas and therapeutic benefits. Lavandin’s higher levels of camphor and cineole give it a more robust and camphorous scent, while Lavender’s higher linalool content contributes to its sweeter and floral fragrance.

Notably, essential oil composition varies based on factors like variety, growth conditions and extraction methods. These variations can impact the specific therapeutic properties and aroma profiles of Lavandin and Lavender essential oils.

Cultivation and Harvesting

Cultivation and harvesting practices for Lavandin and Lavender differ slightly due to variations in their growth habits and environmental preferences.

Here are the key differences in their cultivation and harvesting:

Lavandin:

  • Climate: Lavandin is known to be more tolerant of harsher climates compared to Lavender. It can withstand colder temperatures and is more adaptable to different growing conditions.
  • Soil: Lavandin prefers well-drained soils but will grow in any variety of environments, including clay and sandy ones, provided good drainage is maintained.
  • Cultivation: Lavandin is often cultivated commercially on a larger scale due to its higher essential oil yield and robust growth. It can be propagated through seeds or cuttings.
  • Harvesting: Lavandin is typically harvested when the flowers are in full bloom. The flowering spikes are cut and then processed for essential oil extraction. Harvesting is usually done using mechanized equipment, given the larger scale of cultivation.

Lavender:

  • Climate: Lavender thrives in mild, Mediterranean-like climates with abundant sunshine. It prefers warm summers, cool winters, and well-drained soils.
  • Soil: Lavender requires well-drained soils with good airflow to prevent root rot. Sandy or loamy soils are preferred over heavy clay soils.
  • Cultivation: Lavender can be grown both on a small-scale, such as in home gardens and commercially. It is usually propagated through cuttings rather than seeds to maintain genetic consistency.
  • Harvesting: Lavender is harvested when the flower spikes are in full bloom, typically during the summer months. The flowering stems are cut just above the foliage, leaving enough growth for the plant to recover. Harvesting is often done by hand, as it is more common for smaller-scale cultivation.

Both Lavandin and Lavender require regular pruning to promote healthy growth and to prevent the plants from becoming woody. After harvesting, the flower spikes of Lavandin and Lavender can be used fresh or dried for various applications, including essential oil extraction, culinary uses, crafts, and herbal preparations.

It’s worth noting that specific cultivation and harvesting practices may vary depending on the region, climate, and specific cultivars within the Lavandin and Lavender species. Growers often adapt their practices to optimize plant health and maximize the quality and quantity of essential oil production.

Side Effects and Precautions

While lavender and lavender tend to be safe products for most individuals, it’s wise to be aware of possible side effects and take necessary precautions before beginning their use. Here are some considerations:

Skin Sensitivity:

  • Lavandin and Lavender essential oils can cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals, particularly those with sensitive skin. It is recommended to perform a patch test before applying the oils topically and to dilute them with a suitable carrier oil.

Photosensitivity:

  • Both Lavandin and Lavender essential oils can increase sensitivity to sunlight or UV rays. Direct exposure to sunlight after applying undiluted oils to the skin can lead to skin irritation or sunburn. It is advisable to avoid sun exposure or use appropriate sun protection measures when using these oils topically.

Respiratory Sensitivity:

  • Inhalation of concentrated essential oils, including Lavandin and Lavender, can trigger respiratory irritation or sensitization in some individuals. It is best to use oils in well-ventilated areas and in moderate amounts.

Pregnancy and Children:

  • Pregnant women should exercise caution when using essential oils, including Lavandin and Lavender. It is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional before using essential oils during pregnancy.
  • Essential oils should be used with caution in children, particularly infants and young children. It is recommended to consult with a pediatrician or aromatherapist before using essential oils on or around children.

Drug Interactions:

  • Lavandin and Lavender essential oils may interact with certain medications, including sedatives, anticoagulants, and anticonvulsants. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional if you are taking any medications to ensure there are no potential contraindications or interactions.

Internal Use:

  • Internal use of essential oils is generally not recommended without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapist or healthcare professional. Some essential oils can be toxic when ingested or may cause adverse reactions.

It is essential to note that individual sensitivities and reactions to essential oils can vary. If you experience any adverse reactions or have specific health concerns, it is advisable to discontinue use and consult with a healthcare professional or aromatherapist.

Remember to always use essential oils in moderation, follow proper dilution guidelines, and store them in a safe place, out of reach of children and pets.

Uses and Applications

Lavandin and Lavender have various uses and applications across industries due to their distinct characteristics and therapeutic properties.

Here are the common uses and applications of both:

Lavandin:

  • Fragrance Industry: Lavandin is widely used in the fragrance industry, where its strong and robust scent adds depth and intensity to perfumes, soaps, lotions, and other scented products.
  • Aromatherapy: Lavender essential oil is used in aromatherapy for its uplifting and energizing properties. It can help relieve stress, anxiety, and mental fatigue when diffused or used in massage blends.
  • Cleaning Products: The antiseptic and antibacterial properties of Lavandin make it suitable for use in natural cleaning products, such as surface sprays, laundry detergents, and air fresheners.
  • Cosmetics: Lavandin extracts and oils are often incorporated into cosmetics and skincare products for their fragrance and potential skin-soothing effects.
  • Culinary Uses: Lavandin is occasionally used as a culinary ingredient, primarily in teas, desserts, and flavored beverages. However, it is less commonly utilized for culinary purposes compared to Lavender.

Lavender:

  • Lavender: Lavender has long been acknowledged for its soothing and restorative properties. Aromatherapy: Lavender can provide both aromatherapy and relaxation benefits. Aromatherapy uses essential oils to promote relaxation, enhance sleep quality and decrease stress and anxiety levels.
  • Skincare and Cosmetics: Lavender essential oil and extracts are utilized in skincare products for their potential anti-inflammatory and skin-soothing effects. They are found in creams, lotions, soaps, and other beauty formulations.
  • Perfumery: Lavender is a classic and versatile ingredient in perfumes, offering a sweet and floral note that blends well with other scents.
  • Herbal Remedies: Lavender is used in traditional herbal remedies for its potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic properties. It can be applied topically or used in herbal teas and infusions.
  • Culinary Uses: Culinary-grade Lavender flowers are used as a culinary herb to add a delicate floral flavor to dishes, desserts, beverages, and even savory recipes.

While Lavandin shares some similarities with Lavender, it is valued more for its commercial and strong-smelling applications. Lavender, on the other hand, is widely acknowledged for its soothing and therapeutic qualities that can be employed in aromatherapy or skincare practices.

Conclusion

Lavandin and Lavender are two distinct species within the Lavandula genus, each with its own unique characteristics and properties.

Understanding the difference between Lavandin and Lavender is important for various reasons:

  1. Cultivation: Lavandin and Lavender have different requirements in terms of climate, soil, and cultivation practices. Knowing their specific needs can help growers optimize their cultivation methods and ensure healthy plant growth.
  2. Fragrance: Lavandin and Lavender differ considerably when it comes to scent profiles, with Lavandin having stronger and bolder aromatic qualities while Lavender offers sweeter floral scents that linger longer on your senses. This distinction is crucial for applications in perfumery, aromatherapy, and scented products.
  3. Chemical Composition: The chemical composition of Lavandin and Lavender essential oils varies, resulting in different therapeutic properties and potential effects.

By understanding the difference between Lavandin and Lavender, individuals can make informed decisions about their cultivation, usage, and potential benefits. Whether it’s for personal enjoyment, therapeutic purposes, or commercial applications, this knowledge allows for more precise and effective utilization of these versatile botanicals.